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Coyote Drive In Theater Opens in North Texas

Coyote drive-in theater opens in North Texas this weekend

OCTOBER 28, 2016 12:09 PM

6 Collin County Cities Among Best Real Estate Markets

Six Collin county cities among best real-estate markets

6 collin county among best in real estate

According to latest WalletHub study, 6 Collin County cities were named among the best real-estate markets nationwide. Overall, there are 8 Texas cities in top 20.

See rankings below.

Overall Rank City Total Score ‘Real-Estate Market’ Rank ‘Affordability & Economic Environment’ Rank
1 Frisco, TX 86.76 1 1
2 McKinney, TX 83.87 2 2
3 Richardson, TX 80.95 3 12
4 Murfreesboro, TN 79.80 4 13
5 Austin, TX 79.75 5 8
6 Allen, TX 79.30 14 4
7 Overland Park, KS 78.32 7 40
8 Thornton, CO 77.61 12 17
9 Plano, TX 77.49 13 18
10 Arvada, CO 77.47 9 43
11 Denver, CO 77.11 6 101
12 Denton, TX 77.01 15 28
13 Greeley, CO 76.99 10 60
14 Nashville, TN 76.78 8 80
15 Lincoln, NE 76.56 16 37
16 Cary, NC 76.09 31 3
17 Carrollton, TX 75.95 17 23
18 Seattle, WA 75.38 11 133
19 Boise, ID 74.28 20 68
20 Irvine, CA 74.18 22 53

In order to identify the best real-estate markets, WalletHub’s analysts compared 300 cities across two key dimensions, namely “Real-Estate Market” and “Affordability & Economic Environment.”
They evaluated these categories using 16 relevant metrics, which are listed below with their corresponding weights. Each metric was graded on a 100-point scale, with 100 representing the healthiest housing market.

They then calculated overall scores for each city using the weighted average across all metrics, which were then used to construct final ranking.

Original Post

Collin County Sign Company

Communities Continue to Grapple with Revising Sign Codes

Sign and Graphics Companies, Communities Get Guidance on Temporary Signs

September 1, 2016

Communities continue to grapple with revising sign codes to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Reed v. Town of Gilbert. In recent days, cities and states have faced lawsuits, questioning whether existing codes meet the Supreme Court ruling.

The court case dealt primarily with temporary signs, ensuring that communities must treat all types of temporary signs the same regardless of the message contained on them. Temporary signs have long been an important type of signage—and a complex issue for communities to navigate. The Signage Foundation has revised and updated its Best Practices in Regulating Temporary Signs to provide additional guidance in light of Reed. The research offers information on various types of signs, regulating them and ensuring that any sign codes comply with court rulings, including Reed.

“Because of Reed, real-estate, political and construction signs, etc. are now considered content-based signs because you define them by their content…While it is true that before Reed a few court cases allowed the regulation of a limited number of content-based signs, such as real estate or political signs, those decisions have now been effectively overturned by the Reed decision and should no longer be considered good law,” Wendy Moeller writes in the updated document.

Moeller, AICP, is a principal and owner of Compass Point Planning, a planning and development firm based in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is a member of the Signage Foundation’s board of directors.

In addition to the temporary signs research, the Signage Foundation has updated its analysis of the Reed case. Professor Alan Weinstein, a nationally recognized expert on planning law, provides the guidance in The State of Sign Codes After Reed v. Town of Gilbert. The analysis looks deeper into the court decision and provides guidance for communities in responding to the ruling.

Best Practices in Regulating Temporary Signs and The State of Sign Codes After Reed v. Town of Gilbert are available for free download from the Signage Foundation.

Original Article

Texas Sign Company

Small Businesses Take Major Step Forward in Sign Fight

Small Businesses Take Major Step Forward in Sign Fight

Industry News • July 27

Small businesses hampered by a restrictive permitting process now will now have an easier time getting approval for signs to help advertise their businesses.
The victory came when the Chicago City Council passed a law streamlining the permitting process earlier this month. Previously, those seeking a sign permit had to receive approval from the city council before the sign could be installed. According to the Small Business Advocacy Council, which had worked with a coalition to improve the permitting process for more than a year, the old permitting process could significantly delay the installation of new signs.
According to testimonials of businesses affected, some were unable to install a sign for a number of months after opening—significantly impacting their ability to attract new customers. Others said they took the risky move of installing signs without the proper permits.

The Small Business Advocacy Council coalition included work from local chambers of commerce as well as the International Sign Association and the Illinois Sign Association. ISA and the Illinois Sign Association both brought expertise on the economic value of signs to business and insight into the benefits of streamlining the permitting process.

When the bill passed the City Council, the Small Business Advocacy Council estimated it would reduce the amount of time spent waiting for a permit by 50-80 percent.

To learn more about ISA’s advocacy work on behalf of small businesses, contact David Hickey,David.Hickey@signs.org.

Original Post

Sign Company in Dallas, TX

The coolest new sign in the world (or at least in Portland)

05.11.16 | 2:29 PM

The coolest new sign in the world (or at least in Portland)

Panic, which has been making nifty software for Apple devices for a very long time, just dressed up its headquarters with signage. Which would not be worth even a medium-sized whoop except for one fact: The company not only rigged its sign to change colors, but also built a web app that lets anyone choose a color scheme.

More details—lots of them—from Panic’s Cabel Sasser here.  

Original Post

Signs Manufacturing Sign Company in Dallas Texas

Digital Sign Manufacturer Reviews

How Do The LED Billboard Companies Stack Up?

 

By Dwight Burdette (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

 

The question is, “What do outdoor companies really think about each of the digital sign manufacturers?” A national billboard trade magazine surveyed experienced outdoor advertising company owners.  Here’s what they found:

Daktronics is generally regarded as a good LED product with very poor customer service. Because Daktronics deals with so many very large national accounts, if you are a small company you will not be treated well.  They also require ongoing upgrades to keep their signs functioning. Not a recommended vendor.

Watchfire is also regarded as having a good LED product but an awful sales force (we’ve had problems with them in the past as well). They have decent hardware and software. Technical support is responsive although not stellar by any means.

Formetco is considered a strong brand. Similar to Watchfire.

Yesco and Samsung focus on scoreboards and have poor sales and support of anything else. The hardware is sub-par and the software is poor quality as well.

Chinese manufacturers are terrible. Their claims are incorrect, they ship product that is different from what they sold, technical support doesn’t exist, signs ultimately end up much more expensive than what was bid, BUYER BEWARE!

Signs Manufacturing’s Sunburst Displays aren’t a big entry into the market … yet. But in the Dallas / Fort Worth / Denton metroplex of Texas they are one of the only manufacturers and can provide a turnkey solution with reliability, excellent customer service and accountability.

Dallas LED Digital Billboard Manufacturer

Why Have A Sign Ordinance?

How often do we see this? The City wants to control the clutter of the community so they hone in on their sign ordinance.

Street View, Cluttered

Certainly there’s clutter. Look at that mess!

But what’s wrong with this picture? Where’s the clutter? Are the signs causing a distraction, a mess … a clutter? If you eliminate every sign from this street, is it going to make a difference?

Now let’s go to the extreme. Las Vegas!

Signs on Las Vegas Boulevard

Certainly Vegas has A LOT of signs! You can see them up and down the Boulevard. Digital LED signs, a favorite target of City ordinances, are tremendously popular in Vegas.

So what’s the best way to go? Where is the line between a reasonable, fair ordinance and over-restrictive regulation.

For a business, that’s an easy answer. Eliminate the ordinance altogether! It’s not like a business is going to blanket their building in signage. And if they do, so what? They just spent a ton of money to bring revenue to the City.

For a City, it’s also an easy answer. 12″ tall white unlit letters on the building. One word. No freestanding sign. Believe me, I’ve heard many Sign Inspectors tell me, “They don’t need that signage!”

For my money, the City of Dallas USED to have the best ordinance. They allowed pole signs yet the City was never cluttered with them. They allowed monument signs and again, no clutter. They allowed 8 words or less per elevation on the building. It was a simple ordinance, yet comprehensive.

Now they’re making changes. They enacted a pole sign ordinance that is so severe it either eliminates pole signs or makes them so huge and out of place, sitting in the middle of a business’ parking lot.

Monument signs are now all over, in-your-face blocking street views and lines of sight.

They just recently created an insane ordinance against LED signs. They dramatically increased the amount of time a message had to display on them (as long as 20 minutes per message!), created unenforceable restrictions on the way the signs must be built (and created a legal time bomb between the sign owner and the sign company) and, on top of it all, their new ordinance actually ENCOURAGES larger signs!

Will it make any difference? The pole sign ordinance changed 15 years ago. Have you noticed it? Would you say the City is more or less cluttered now than it was 15 years ago?

I think the solution is a simple ordinance that is also simple to enforce, not creating an unnecessary burden on your City Inspectors. Generally limit signs to 75% of the width of the building and 25% of the height.

Limit pole signs to 200 sqft on side roads, as long as there is a 10′ setback from the property line and the bottom of the sign is at least 10′ off of the ground to keep it from cluttering the street.

Monument signs should have a 15′ setback to keep from blocking visibility to the side streets. Other than that, no restrictions on their size or height (any other restrictions are pointless anyways).

I’m sure my suggestions fall on deaf ears, as it is in the government’s nature to regulate. But maybe some City, somewhere, will see the reality of Sign Ordinances and make the right move to help their businesses, their economy and the poor Sign Permitting Technicians that have to deal with these Cities.

 

 

 

Butting Heads With a non-Business Friendly Regulating City Sign Ordinance

 

EMC Signage Texas

Digital EMC Sign

Fight EMC Regulations with Information

As we monitor sign code issues around the country, one of the most frequent challenges ISA encounters is the issue of brightness and Electronic Message Centers (EMCs). Communities often want to regulate EMC brightness which, if not done properly, can make these kinds of signs less effective.

That’s why ISA developed EMC Night-time Brightness Recommendations to guide local officials on the responsible and effective use of these innovative signs.

Over the past few years, more than 150 cities across the country have adopted ISA’s recommendations in-whole or in-part, making it easier for sign and visual communications companies to use this tool to better serve end users. The research upon which these recommendations are based was conducted by Dr. Ian Lewin, a leading lighting expert with more than 30 years of experience in the lighting industry.

“With so many cities across the country focusing on digital brightness issues, this has been a great opportunity for the sign and visual communications industry to provide useful and easy-to-understand information on what can be a controversial and complex issue,” said David Hickey, ISA vice president of government relations. “In many ways, local officials are in the dark when it comes to knowing how EMCs work and how to optimize their effectiveness. These recommendations can and have been used many times to help provide answers to these problems, to everyone’s satisfaction.”

If your local officials are discussing regulating EMCs, EMC Night-time Brightness Recommendations is a great starting point. Other popular resources include:

www.signs.org

Signs Manufacturing Corporation

Why You Should Buy From A Local Sign Manufacturer

Veterinary clinic appeals ruling, wanting to place new sign in front of business

by  on July 10, 2015 in News

One of the public hearings at the July meeting of the New Albany Board of Aldermen was a case appealed from planning and zoning concerning a request for a variance from the city’s sign ordinance.

The owners of New Albany Animal Clinic, from Holly Springs, had purchased a $22,000 lighted sign with message board to replace the old, small wooden sign presently in the field in front of the building, not aware the city had sign restrictions.

They were told the sign could not be used because it is larger than allowed and also has internal lighting, which is prohibited (confusingly, a similar sign on a tall pole instead of sitting on the ground could be approved).

Attorney Bill Rutledge, representing the doctors, said the ordinance is not easily accessible to the public unless someone knows to ask for it, that the new sign would replace a small, battered old sign and that the size limitation was intended to prevent obstruction of the view by drivers. He noted this sign would be nearly 100 feet from the road, obstructing nothing.

Concerning the internal lighting restriction, Mayor Kent said he understood that was originally aimed more at the proliferation of portable “flashing arrow” signs around town when the ordinance was written.

Rutledge listed the possible conditions needed to grant a variance and argued this sign meets every one. “That’s why variances exist,” he said. “Use common sense. You don’t have to follow the ordinance letter by letter. This is a unique situation.”

He also mentioned examples of other signs that have been allowed although they do not meet city requirements. “We need to be friendly to business; say yes, not no,” he added.

One of the owners, Dr. Robert Childers, said he knows now they should have asked before getting the sign, but did not then. He told aldermen they want to build their practice, have a veterinarian living here full-time, add services and become more a part of the community. He also said the sign would be used for public service messages as well as to promote the clinic.

Board attorney Regan Russell said aldermen had three possible courses of action: vote on the request immediately, take the request under advisement until the next meeting, or propose an amendment to the sign ordinance that would permit the sign.

Ward Two Alderman Johnny Anderson said he did not like the idea of overrunning the planning and zoning commission unless it were really necessary but it was noted that this was a case where the commission had no choice according to the wording of the law.

Eventually, aldermen voted to take the request under advisement until the August meeting, partly because some other amendments to the sign ordinance have been proposed and it could be that the ordinance just needs overhauling.

Later, in the last public appearance of the night, aldermen considered a request from Jeff Knox, who owns the home at the corner of Apple and Glade next to the middle school gym. The home has sustained water damage and it was determined that this was partly due to a city curb problem allowing water to run under the house. Mayor Kent said part of the problem also was due to water running off the gym. The city’s part of the problem has been corrected, Kent said. Knox had an estimate for damages but Kent said he should check with the school officials to see what they would do and then aldermen would decide how much they would pay at the August board meeting.

Original Article: http://newalbanygazette.com/2015/07/10/veterinary-clinic-appeals-ruling-wanting-to-place-new-sign-in-front-of-business/

SignsManufacturing.com

 

Sign Service Request App | It’s Finally Here For The iPhone!

It’s taken longer than expected but the Sign Service Request App is finally here!

Main Screen Contact Info Settings

Sign Service Request on iPhone

Sign Service Request on Android

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use this app to easily take a photo of your sign and automatically send it in for a service request.

Make it easy on yourself! If your business sign is not working properly, simply use this app to snap up to four photos of your sign and with one click send them in to Signs Manufacturing for a service call. Signs Manufacturing will send you a confirmation, an estimated date of service (in the Dallas / Fort Worth, Texas metroplex) and then send a Technician to repair your sign.

Don’t worry about over-the-top charges. You will receive a quotation for anything that is not a standard service call before that work is performed.

Location services must be turned ON so that we know the location that the photo was taken.

Signs Manufacturing Corporation